the Attic

When Bill and I were first looking for a house together, there were a few things that I really wanted.  I didn’t care how many bedrooms or baths, and I didn’t care about the year it was built or the style.  Granted, house-hunting is quite different here in New York than anywhere I’ve been.  There aren’t “suburbs” and new construction means “double-wide” or anything after 1960.  So, I adapted with a few requirements that stuck.

First, I wanted a place to garden.  Pulling weeds is relaxing to me, so I need a place to plant things, that I may or may not kill in my own way and time.  (I have started a garden of sorts here and the cherry tomatoes are growing!)

Secondly, I really wanted a fireplace. It is so cold here, and the snow makes that bearable.  But, the fireplace is my winter therapy.  The light even makes a room seem warmer than it is.  We’ve adapted the coal fireplace here to a usable status; so we’ll show you that in a later post.

Lastly, I wanted a walk in attic.

the attic stairs

Now, I didn’t realize that could be something that one could want, until we visited a glorious Federal home a few towns away.  This amazing brick house was a consideration of ours, but the trailer park neighborhood across the street drove away our interest.  However, it had a full walk up attic, where “I” could stand!  And it had windows, and old trunks!  Quickly, needing an attic became a requirement.

East side, and windows to house front

For most of the houses we visited, Bill looked at the attic and the basements first, to give me a full report.  At 60 West Main, it looked promising when I saw the STAIRS that led up to the attic for this house.  Bill shook his head and said, “Well, its a deal breaker, you’re not going to like this.”  I couldn’t have imagined what it would look like.

Windows facing the back yard

The trap door opened to reveal a full walk up attic, with windows on all four sides and the original beams showing their hardy structure.  I was in love, and ready to move my studio in right away.  Apparently, though, I’m not allowed to put a wood stove up there, and its not safe to heat without changing the whole thing.  We would have to put up sheet rock to cover the beams, and insulation and ultimately hide its glory in order to “use” it for living space.

So, instead, I visit it when I can, and I’ve put a light up there so that it shines through the three stained glass windows up there on winter nights.  This year, I might even put a small Christmas tree in one of the front windows.

At the top of the attic stairs
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Dining Room, phase 1

We started with the dining room first, because it seemed to have the least work to do and we wanted to feel as though we really accomplished something.  When we originally looked at the house, there was a huge drum-

Dining room, pre paint

set in the room.  The walls were patched, and the undercoat was a dirty yellow.  But, its a HUGE room, with three large windows at one end and a curved cove at the other.  Yes, the light appears to be original, too.

And so, the real work began.  We have to re-paint and repair all of the rooms downstairs before we can refinish the floors, and that is another post of course.

Bill priming the ceiling

I chose a soft lime sage green for the base coat.  We had to patch and prime the entire room and ceiling beforehand, though. What we didn’t know at the time, however, was that the ceiling had been wallpapered at one time.  That old glue showed up much later, after the whole room had been completed and the ceiling started to peel.  Thankfully, it was our first ceiling, so re-doing it was more of a lesson learned well than anything.  Bill is still working on that part, but should be done in the next few weeks.

Dining room, post stenciling

Painting the room was a quick process, but the stenciling took about 6 weeks or so.  It was well worth it.  Though you can’t tell from these photos, we fixed all the windows, cleaned the hardware and the woodwork.  Most of the original hardware appears to be either copper or a rose colored bronze.  Most, if not all the windows in the house are dual hung, so that the sashes open from the top and the bottom.  We have replaced all the cords here in the dining room, so they are all completely functional.  The second phase of the dining room will involved refinishing the floors and getting real furniture.  Might be a ways off.

Other side of the dining room, (swinging door goes to pantry.)

Our last piece of the dining room came as a bit of a surprise to both of us.  Bill actually finished the ceiling while I was away this past week and we both decided that the light needed a little something.  So, we planned to put a plaster medallion in place around the base, and I thought I could clean the fixture while it was down.  Originally, I had thought it was plated with brass or gold and needed to be re-done.  However, with a closer look and some cleaning, I discovered that it was silver!  And, might not be just silver plate, either.  Check out the before and after!  Woo hoo, another sweet surprise that the house holds.

Dining room light before cleaning. . .
. . . and after polishing